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A Van delivered wood to two firms in a week. the following details are available.

0 Votes
A Van delivered wood to two firms in a week. the following details are available.

Firm Weight of wood delivered Distance covered
(kilograms) (kilometres)

P 200 250

Q 500 800

The Van cost $675,000 to operate for the week. Each delivery was carried separately and there were no other deliveries during the week.

What is the cost per kilogram/ kilometre of wood delivered in the week (to the nearest $0.01)?

May 2nd 2014 AN ACCA USER 340 Points

8 Replies

+1 Vote

You have to calculate total kilogram-kilometres and divide total cost by that figure:
200 x 250 = 50,000
500 x 800=400,000

So in total: 50,000 + 400,000 = 450,000 kg-km

Therefore cost per kg-km = $675,000/450,000 = $1.5 per kg-km.

Hope this helps.

P.S. Note that although sometimes written like that, it's not kg/km (meaning kg divided by km), rather it's kg multiplied by km, that's why I prefer to write it with "-", not with "/".

May 12th 2014 AN ACCA USER 400 Points
0 Votes

May be :-
kg p q
200 500
1 : 2.5
so
q = 2.5 p
200p+500(2.5)p=675000
200p+1250p=675000
p=465.51
q=
200(465.51)+500q=675000
93102+500q=675000
500q=675000-93102
q=1163.79
is it correct
please confirm

May 5th 2014 AN ACCA USER 260 Points
Edited May 5th 2014 AN ACCA USER
0 Votes
You have to calculate total kilogram-kilometres and divide total cost by that figure:
200*250=50,000
500*800=400,000

So in total: 50,000+400,000=450,000

Therefore cost per kg-km = $675,000/450,000 = $1.5 per kg-km.

Hope this helps

P.S. Note that although sometimes written like that, it's not kg/km (meaning kg divided by km), rather it's kg multiplied by km, that's why I prefer to write it with "-", not with "/".
May 12th 2014 AN ACCA USER 400 Points
Reshown February 12th 2015 AN ACCA USER
0 Votes

Thanks Samir Alaskarov,
P.S. is awesome.
you mean cost per kilogram per kilometer is cost/(kg*km) ain't it?
Or say cost per kilometer per kilogram means the same.
The same mathematical expression can be written as
cost/(kg*km) = (Cost/kg)/km
Now try expressing (Cost/kg)/km into words....

Thanks again

May 16th 2014 AN ACCA USER 8,730 Points
0 Votes
Thanks Samir Alaskarov,
P.S. is awesome.
you mean cost per kilogram per kilometer is cost/(kg*km) ain't it?
May 16th 2014 AN ACCA USER 8,730 Points
0 Votes
Mathematically your reasoning for cost per kg per km is correct, but with this wording it doesn't mean anything to me, and it's not what I'm talking about. (Do I "sound" rude? It seems to me I'm "talking" rudely...)
Cost per kg/km will be cost/(kg/km) which is different to (cost/kg)/km, but we need cost/(kg*km) and it's the same as (cost/kg)/km. I don't write cost per kg*km because "*" looks somewhat weird in writing.
Anyway it's not an important issue for test-takers, just a side note. (You can see the same thing in kilowatt-hour used to measure electricity usage, it's also multiplication, and is written separately or with "-" but not with "/".)
P.S. By the way, today I took and passed F2, and I wish everyone here who has not yet passed the exam good luck and easy pass in their exams :)
May 16th 2014 AN ACCA USER 400 Points
0 Votes
Hi Samir,
Congratulation, I'm happy to hear the good news.
Sorry, if those words sound harsh.
I was just drilling things down
And thanks for your clarification..
May 16th 2014 AN ACCA USER 8,730 Points
0 Votes
Thanks, and no need to apologize. Good luck with your exams...
May 17th 2014 AN ACCA USER 400 Points
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